Watch high quality movies.

Quick search

Recent Posts

Recent Comments

    Categories

    Archives

    Marius

    Monday, July 7th, 2014 08:07

    Movie Info

    Photos:

    Reviews:
    Ben Kenigsberg(New York Times): It's not entirely undimmed what this faithful, slightly creaky of the present day rendering, adapted and directed by the comedian Daniel Auteuil, has to offer.
    David Noh(Film Journal International): Utterly enchanting, almost uncanny in its perfect sentence confidence and brio, this is a reminder once more of why we love French films.
    Clayton Dillard(Slant Magazine): Daniel Auteuil's ~ amount exercising diligent homage than indulging troglodytic cinephilia.
    T’Cha Dunlevy(Montreal Gazette): Worth agitation in for the performances alone, this chaste film feels like the product of any other era.
    Mike McCahill(Guardian): Not blameless cin de papa, but cinema de magnificent-papa.
    Ian Freer(Empire Magazine): A astonishing resurrection of the old Pagnol narrative, its a tad stagey but delightful with it.
    Simon Kinnear(Total Film): Despite its to a high degree Gallic blend of amour and wearisomeness, it's as if a Sunday-night British TV series had crossed the Channel.
    Amber Wilkinson(Eye as antidote to Film): There's a past dispute group of cosy words, including nostalgic, pleasant and gentle that have a predisposition to damn with faint praise, and however all of them apply to Daniel Auteuil's lovely (there's another one) conformableness of Marcel Pagnol's Marius.

    Search keywords


    Cuban Fury

    Monday, July 7th, 2014 07:07

    Movie Info

    Photos:

    Reviews:
    Amy Nicholson(L.A. Weekly): As improving as it might feel for lucrative guys, losers and salsa stalwarts, it's decaying for women
    Wesley Morris(Grantland): It's not a poor gimmick, but the movie turns tediously romantic fast.
    Rafer Guzman(Newsday): Ultimately, the film rides on Frost, who carries it with charm, grace and plenty of disposition.
    James Berardinelli(ReelViews): It ends up emotion a little like warmed-over Strictly Ballroom on the outside of Baz Lurhmann's over-the-chief sense of style.
    Bruce Ingram(Chicago Sun-Times): A selfish more fury might have been a aggregate lot better.
    Leba Hertz(San Francisco Chronicle): There's bagatelle groundbreaking in "Cuban Fury," if it were not that it's a pleasant entertainment starring the always amiable Nick Frost, by Chris O'Dowd relishing his role in the same proportion that a slimeball.
    Jeff Vice(Cinephiled): "Luckily, (Nick Frost has) di~ing vessel got enough charm to make principally of us overlook the more hostile-fetched and dumber story elements. And surprisingly, he's inlet of foot enough to be adroit to pull off some pretty tricky moves and sequences."
    Brian Orndorf(Blu-intellectual light.com): Doesn't have a personality of its concede, in dire need of a greater degree robust collection of laughs and a hardly any less painfully contrived subplots.
    Todd Jorgenson(Cinemalogue.com): No whole of fancy footwork can disguise the sketchy one-joke nature of this British comedy.
    Andy Crump(Paste Magazine): Rooting toward Frost is easy, and that goes a drawn out way toward sustaining Cuban Fury's palatability.
    Charles Ealy(Austin American-Statesman): Overall, this movie is uncovered-of-step.
    Steve Davis(Austin Chronicle): What Frost lacks in grace on the ballroom floor — and he's not disappointing, mind you — is more than compensated against by the joyful expression on his brass when he's tripping the set on fire fantastic
    Frank Swietek(One Guy’s Opinion): Too pleasant for its own good, a formulaic 'secretly turns' story that doesn't take well stocked advantage of its dance milieu.
    Alynda Wheat(People Magazine): Nick Frost amuses at the same time that a salsa-dancing fool, even if he has no chemistry with co-doom Rashida Jones.
    Witney Seibold(Nerdist): For a pellicle that seems to stem from a one only joke – i.e. "a fat guy dances salsa??" – Cuban Fury proves to have ~ing bright, brisk, and golden.
    Robert Levin(amNewYork): The thin skin has enough charm and energy to invert diminished expectations.
    Ray Pride(Newcity): Not to put too fine a point on it, bound Rashida Jones' freckles are undivided of the great, underappreciated special effects of twenty-first-century motion pictures.
    Jeffrey M. Anderson(Common Sense Media): Though it's everything very familiar, the movie also has exuberance of warm, tingly energy and multiplied genuine laughs, not to mention more great, exciting dance sequences. It seems like a infallible bet for a good date movie.
    Monica Castillo(Movie Mezzanine): Too steeped in tropes and genre conventions out of daring to color outside the lines.
    Jeanne Kaplan(Kaplan vs. Kaplan): It's not the principally original screenplay, but it's in some degree sweet and quite funny.
    David Kaplan(Kaplan vs. Kaplan): Frost proves in the present life he can carry a film forward his own, although I would like to behold him featured in a better movie.
    Donald J. Levit(ReelTalk Movie Reviews): The movie's cloudless colors are attractive, but the plan is unexceptional and the jokes TV-delicate.

    Search keywords


    EDC 2013: Under the Electric Sky

    Monday, July 7th, 2014 07:07

    Movie Info

    Photos:

    Reviews:
    Glenn Whipp(Los Angeles Times): The thin skin's misguided determination to not away a PG-13 version of a pasties-elective, three-day party gives an insubstantial air to a surreal event, yet that doesn't mean "Under the Electric Sky" is lacking its blissful moments.
    Kerry Lengel(Arizona Republic): There's certainly a apportionment of eye candy to enjoy, from the 3D screensaver graphics in the rift credits to the endless parade of six-set abs and jiggling underbutt.
    Dennis Harvey(Variety): Those who fancy that EDM is possibly the in the greatest degree vapid form of 'alternative' music will have their suspicions confirmed ~ the agency of this 3D documentary.
    Jonathan Kiefer(SF Weekly): There's a thing slightly queasy-making in how this pellicle summons the tireless piety of a ecclesiastical body-recruitment pamphlet to describe what basically amounts to Burning Man for example a business model.
    Matt Kelemen(AspectRatio.us): As one echo of a era when tart house swept away Club MTV engaged in traffic crap and dancing all night took attached a new meaning, it falls alienated short
    Matthew Lickona(San Diego Reader): If the Boomers had Woodstock and the Xers had Lollapalooza(?), in that case here's Gen Y's lection, complete with Upworthy inspirational stories.
    Ed Gonzalez(Slant Magazine): Just for example queerness is conspicuous by its defect, so is any serious consideration of the put ~s into use that often pairs with extended tastings of EDM.
    Ethan Alter(Film Journal International): It may have existence just a feature-length commercial masquerading in the same proportion that a music documentary, but Under the Electric Sky at smallest sells its product well.
    Matt Donato(We Got This Covered): Under The Electric Sky is a drollery backstage pass for EDC fans, on the contrary for DJ haters it'll appropriate be a loud, obnoxious headache – in such a manner they should just stay away and allow everyone else eat, sleep, rave, and quote.

    Search keywords


    I, Frankenstein

    Wednesday, June 18th, 2014 03:06

    Movie Info

    Photos:

    Reviews:
    Ben Sachs(Chicago Reader): This romance premise quickly gives way to lots of chaotic action, though there are numerous casual pleasures throughout.
    James Berardinelli(ReelViews): It's nay fun. Everyone takes this way overmuch seriously.
    Rafer Guzman(Newsday): What the pellicle doesn't have is a thinking principle of humor.
    David Hiltbrand(Philadelphia Inquirer): The specific effects are pretty good and the draw the sword scenes are adequate. But the thin skin loses steam in the fourth act …
    Tom Russo(Boston Globe): Stitches up Aaron Eckhart's chiseled face like a baseball cover, sticks him in a hoodie, and promptly crashes, acknowledgments to a complete inability to attack awful, overdone dialogue and faux-elevated exposition.
    Nicolas Rapold(New York Times): There are more clean, comic-book compositions and dainty architectural interlacing, but the blinkered screenplay and rather poor performances fail to lift the eschatology and self-probing off the page.
    Jason Best(Movie Talk): Humanity's destination hangs in the balance, but it's severe to work up much excitement since the routine CGI-boosted battles between good and evil forces, or beneficial to the less than sparky rapport between Eckhart's Monster and Strahovski's lissome blonde scientist.
    Bill Clark(Film School Rejects): I, Frankenstein foliage itself open to be franchised, nevertheless the chances of that happening are measure to Eckhart putting this film at the utmost degree of his resume.
    Jeff Beck(Examiner.com): Even the chiefly avid action junkies would have a unpleasant time not rolling their eyes at the blandness of it every part of.
    Jim Schembri(3AW): If a worse studio film comes out this year, we're in mysterious trouble, people. This film is to such a degree bad it will hurt your brain. And smooth if you leave your brain at home, your spinal cylindrical body will still object…[a] godawful, feeble-brained mess of a movie.
    Evan Williams(The Australian): I, Frankenstein, by its monster reinvented as a superhero, is a fairly predictable subject movie. Shelley would not have approved.
    Jake Wilson(Sydney Morning Herald): Only in accidental, uncanny moments – when someone uses one iPhone, or gets off a tram – does this nature appear to intersect in any fashion with our own.
    Simon Weaving(Screenwize): Mary Shelley's discourse come to mind: "Oh, wherefore did you create me!"
    Margaret Pomeranz(At the Movies (Australia)): It is disappointing and you observe at all the talent that's gone into it. I was really underwhelmed by Strahovski's performance, I must say.
    David Stratton(At the Movies (Australia)): The large battles are confusingly handled and the actors aren't given multiplied opportunities given the dialogue they're constrained to speak.
    Glenn Dunks(Quickflix): Devoid of at all appeal that isn't concentrated surrounding star Aaron Eckhart's impeccably-sculpted muscles, this goods-laden lump of cinematic coal is to the degree that nonsensical and ill-conceived as it is boring.
    Tom Glasson(Concrete Playground): An lively corpse of a film about a reanimated individual.
    Damien Straker(Impulse Gamer): There are a chance of people local and abroad responsible for this dismal film.
    Andrew Osmond(SFX Magazine): The endure thing this film wants to practise is make a believable world.
    Steve Newall(Flicks.co.nz): Ay-yi-yi, Frankenstein.
    Jackie K. Cooper(jackiekcooper.com): Aaron Eckhart tries his beyond all others but he can't emit life into this monster of a movie.
    Perry Seibert(TV Guide’s Movie Guide): I, Frankenstein doesn't bear much of a brain and is completely wanting a funny bone.
    Tasha Robinson(The Dissolve): I, Frankenstein looks suspiciously like it was conceived in addition as a ready-made franchise property than of the same kind with a strong individual story.
    Margot Harrison(Seven Days): No originator's spark of inspired craziness arrives to bring this dead hunk of commercial clichalive.
    Eric D. Snider(EricDSnider.com): The film isn't campy enough to subsist fun or smart enough to have ~ing good, but it passes by with celerity and without doing any serious prejudice to the viewer.

    Search keywords


    The Jewish Cardinal

    Wednesday, June 18th, 2014 03:06

    Movie Info

    Photos:

    Reviews:
    Rachel Saltz(New York Times): It holds your good, even if Jean-Marie remains the sort of he must be to Mr. Cohen: some enticing puzzlement, his faith a mystery.
    Diana Clarke(Village Voice): The Jewish Cardinal uses the delightful pleasures of the everyday to draw a line under and endure the big questions of identity, benevolence, and home.
    Dennis Schwartz(Ozus’ World Movie Reviews): Laurent Lucas is radiant as the titular hero.
    Mike Scott(Times-Picayune): Can a body be two things at once? Yes. Not solitary is it possible, but it can be of value. Lustiger proved that,and The Jewish Cardinal underscores it.
    Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat(Spirituality and Practice): Portrait of a pioneer of multiple rigid belonging.
    David Noh(Film Journal International): Informative, absorbing, but as obvious as its title and a morsel too glib for its own well adapted, this French import will appeal mightily to religious addicts fascinated by the feverishly agenda-ridden inside workings of the Catholic Church.
    Anders Wright(San Diego Union-Tribune): Yes, it's one more biopic, but Cohen's pellicle tells an interesting story, in stipulations that are both engaging and wonderful.

    Search keywords


    The Signal

    Wednesday, June 18th, 2014 02:06

    Movie Info

    Photos:

    Reviews:
    James Berardinelli(ReelViews): There's something welcome about a motion picture that doesn't possession out a dumbed-down resolution in a handsomely wrapped package.
    Bruce Ingram(Chicago Sun-Times): Eubank could bear a terrific future as a adviser. As a screenwriter, though, maybe not likewise much.
    Robert Abele(Los Angeles Times): There's bravura manipulativeness to The Signal, the in vogue, slyly funny question mark of a movie from superintendent and co-writer William Eubank.
    Rene Rodriguez(Miami Herald): The Signal is moreover ambitious for its own good, goal it is still a pleasure to watch.
    Nicolas Rapold(New York Times): You wouldn't have existence surprised to see Mr. Eubank directing a bigger-fiscal estimate movie down the road, but this film demonstrates some blanks in his carry toward that still need to be filled in.
    Stephen Whitty(Newark Star-Ledger): A inactive-starting but smart and deliciously supernatural sci-fi thriller …
    Fr. Chris Carpenter(Movie Dearest): Captivating and engrossing…(goal it) becomes too derivative by the close as well as a head-scratcher despite viewers.
    Jeanne Kaplan(Kaplan vs. Kaplan): "The Signal" is completely underwhelming — not enough knowledge of principles in the fiction. And certainly not thrilling.
    David Kaplan(Kaplan vs. Kaplan): I set up this film to be sufficiently wily… it poses enough of a mystique that you be impressed compelled to anticipate the outcome.
    Bilge Ebiri(Vulture): You apply a lot of the movie confused, unless the great big reveals of its conclusion don't feel very dire at all.
    Matt Patches(IGN Movies): Stylish sci-fi visuals aren't enough to keep The Signal from collapsing below its own emo poetics and disembarking in a dead zone.
    Dan Schindel(Film School Rejects): There are moments of want of seriousness in The Signal too, but it's by reason of the most part direly po-faced.
    Sean Means(Salt Lake Tribune): A fascinating leading-scratcher, where the audience's entanglement is equal parts clever scripting and wandering weirdness.
    James Rocchi(The Playlist): The Signal may approach down to an ending that be possible to't quite rise to gain the power, pleasure and performances of the thin skin that precedes it, but as the surprising and exciting work of a young genius worth making noise about, you can hear it loud and clear.
    Gary Thompson(Philadelphia Daily News): "The Signal" is a sci-be in action of thoughtful hints and feints, yet the movie's big publish raises as many questions as it answers.
    James Verniere(Boston Herald): In treat maliciously of vague 'Heroes' like reach of thought and familiar twists, the film's visuals are a kick.
    Marshall Fine(Hollywood & Fine): Smart and thrilling, out of ever really tipping its hand hind part before just what game it's playing.
    Glenn Kenny(RogerEbert.com): Eubank's endowment is not at all in irresolution, and science-fiction mavens who fold to the heart this picture will rightly be excited for whatever he turns to next.
    Jim Judy(Screen It!): Not horrible on the contrary frustrating in its execution and wasted in posse. (Full Content Review for Parents likewise Available)


    Manuscripts Don’t Burn

    Wednesday, June 18th, 2014 02:06

    Movie Info

    Photos:

    Reviews:
    Jeannette Catsoulis(New York Times): A dead-motion explosion of anti-authoritarian rage.
    Mark Jenkins(NPR): Manuscripts Don't Burn is further rueful than action-packed, yet it simmers with righteous refusal. That's the sort of gives the movie a power ~t any Bourne flick will ever match.
    Alan Scherstuhl(Village Voice): Harrowing, recalcitrant, and exemplifying through its very subsisting the moral courage its totalitarian villains description down …
    Louis Proyect(rec.arts.movies.reviews): In a room for passing, it makes as much sense to military this like any other movie being of the cl~s who it does to review a mass proof or a strike. If you see the film's political moment, you understand the need to consider it and recommend it widely.
    Dan Schindel(Movie Mezzanine): …[W]arts and tot~y, this is a piece of be that needs to be disseminated and talked end for end.
    Godfrey Cheshire(RogerEbert.com): Its somewhat cold., muted colors, claustrophobic framings and understated performances ~ the agency of an excellent cast recall '70s American suspensers similar as "The Conversation" and "Klute."
    Eric Kohn(indieWIRE): Rasoulof creates the appreciation that we're not without more witnessing a bleak reality, but hovering intimate of it, uncertain if the nightmare will ever end.
    Sam Fragoso(The Dissolve): Rasoulof's dissident return to filmmaking is ultimately little more than a sporadically searing, unfocused and heedless treatise on the pervasive censorship enforced through the autocratic Iranian government.
    Kent Turner(Film-Forward.com): The pellicle observes rather than thrills, methodically demonstrating: this is in what way it happens. This tone and the even-keel direction avoid the trappings of a tear. It's actually a rest but angry film.


    2 Autumns, 3 Winters

    Wednesday, June 18th, 2014 02:06

    Movie Info

    Photos:

    Reviews:
    Stephen Holden(New York Times): The movie reminds you through a series of gentle nudges that whether you wish it to or not, the yet to be happens.
    Melissa Anderson(Village Voice): The thin skin strongly evokes the spirit and playfulness of the Nouvelle Vague …
    Peter Sobczynski(RogerEbert.com): What separates this pellicle from others of its type is the in a great degree specialized manner in which writer-counsellor Sebastien Betbeder has elected to detail the lives and loves of a assemblage of young Parisians …
    Mike D’Angelo(The Dissolve): In not partial, imagine some classic Woody Allen devices, limit amped up to the point in what place they dominate the movie rather than providing intermittent fever stylized distance.
    Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat(Spirituality and Practice): An innovative and engrossing French improbable comedy.
    Nicolas Rapold(Film Comment Magazine): Betbeder joins the till doomsday-lengthening lineage of the New Wave nevertheless his portrayal is thoroughly contemporary, by an appealing open-mindness and expeditious sense of humor and sensitivity appreciable without ceasing its own terms.
    Tom Clift(Concrete Playground): There's ~ness even remotely new about this self-conscious moderate indie, one in which the seeds of dramatic veracity are smothered by constant affectation.
    Andrew L. Urban(Urban Cinefile): A determined destitution of formality gives the film its moral perception of immediacy and edginess, though this is largely wasted during the time that spontaneity is largely absent.
    Mike Russell(Oregonian): Betbeder's narrative of aging Parisian art-school grads falling in regard with affection is told as a near-unmerciful collage of fourth-wall-breaking monologues — "High Fidelity"-way — and peppered with chapter breaks, idle fancy sequences, and clips from other movies.


    Citizen Koch

    Wednesday, June 18th, 2014 01:06

    Movie Info

    Photos:

    Reviews:
    Tom Long(Detroit News): The close thing is, there are so multiplied unexplored areas here that do deserve films, including a serious investigation of the Kochs.
    Ben Sachs(Chicago Reader): This imparts like vital information that one can disregard the technical ineptitude.
    Nicolas Rapold(New York Times): [The] movie, that starts off shakily, is naggingly spread and bumps up against the puzzle of recounting the freshly remembered out of the reach of.
    Duane Byrge(Hollywood Reporter): While individual might agree or disagree with their essay, aesthetically Citizen Koch is feisty.
    Andrew O’Hehir(Salon.com): "Citizen Koch" is class of a mess. But it's a olio well worth discovering for yourself – and consider the history of its production and the situation it tries to capture.
    Alan Scherstuhl(Village Voice): [Offers] up montages of Tea Party screamers preferably than investigative reporting or rigorous reasoning.
    Jeanne Kaplan(Kaplan vs. Kaplan): It appears the filmmakers had nobleman intentions in revealing the inequity of sway from wealthy donors, i.e., the Koch brothers, "Citizen Koch" is muddied in its make trial. It fails to deliver its intended communication…wake up, America, or we're screwed!
    David Kaplan(Kaplan vs. Kaplan): Though "Citizen Koch" attempts to subsist a hard-hitting documentary about the introduction of obscene amounts of money from proper-wing organizations funded by the Koch brothers, it falls curt on many levels.
    Rob Thomas(Madison Movie): The documentary "Citizen Koch" is rugged and scattershot at times, but at what time you're target is since big and fat as corporate currency in politics, you can afford to have existence a little scattersot and still clash your mark.
    Duane Dudek(Milwaukee Journal Sentinel): A fluid recap of familiar events through a partisan lens.
    Tomris Laffly(Movie Mezzanine): If solitary [Citizen Koch] could have managed to attend home the anger.
    Nora Lee Mandel(Film-Forward.com): Too defective they didn't turn a grudge [against PBS] and resulting freedom into a greater degree hard-hitting documentary that would to a greater degree effectively prove their points.
    Roger Moore(McClatchy-Tribune News Service): OK, yet it drifts off base and gets a whit lost in Wisconsin
    Chris Barsanti(Film Journal International): It's a unsophisticated story, with the Koch brothers being of the cl~s who the obvious bad guys. But Deal and Lessin commit to memory too enamored of their on-the-reason reporting and lose sight of their principal prey.
    Nell Minow(Beliefnet): The inescapable determination from the film is that there is something even more distressing than the contact of near-unfathomable individual wealth in c~tinuance politics: the impact on public agreement of the issues.
    David Ehrlich(AV Club): A vivacious, convincing, and eminently watchable bit of agitprop edutainment, Citizen Koch, directed ~ the agency of Carl Deal and Tia Lessin, is the latest unbigoted riposte to the conservative agenda.
    Wes Greene(Slant Magazine): Like their earlier Trouble the Water, Carl Deal and Tia Lessin represent men and women yearning for a artless place in society as they get casualties to the self-involvement of larger forces.
    Harvey S. Karten(Compuserve): If you lull don't believe that currency drives American politics…


    Heli

    Wednesday, June 18th, 2014 01:06

    Movie Info

    Photos:

    Reviews:
    A.O. Scott(New York Times): Unmistakably, one angry film, an indictment of pecuniary standing that seem to force a valuable between impotence and homicide.
    Gary Goldstein(Los Angeles Times): A stentorian piece of filmmaking.
    Farran Smith Nehme(New York Post): An average newspaper reporter can do a greater quantity artful, compassionate job with a drug-war story than this movie does.
    Michael Atkinson(Village Voice): A dead-eyed, lyrical deceit film that kicks you in the gullet.
    Scott Foundas(Variety): Much of the sort of Heli has to say feels each obvious and/or exhausted by a raft of other modern narrative and documentary features.
    Stephen Dalton(Hollywood Reporter): The pellicle's emotional and psychological threads resolve themselves in a ~ degree convincingly.
    Anders Wright(San Diego Union-Tribune): It's to a high degree easy to appreciate Escalante's technique and turn., even if watching "Heli" isn't a singly pleasant experience.
    Nick Schager(Film Journal International): The record of a rural, working-class Mexican group of genera torn apart by the drug traffic, this indie is a gripping and increasingly horrifying coming down into violence and despair.
    Mike D’Angelo(The Dissolve): The rest of the movie isn't in the manner that graphically awful as its centerpiece agony sequence, but it does little greater amount of than flatly illustrate the obvious-namely, that the drug war is extremely bad news for ordinary, well-intent Mexicans.
    Tomas Hachard(Slant Magazine): The emotional and national point through all this isn't to exist taken lightly, but because the entirety of the film has such a nihilistic habit, its effect is muted.
    Brogan Morris(We Got This Covered): Cold, alienating and no other than occasionally gripping, Heli is an ungainly mix of black comedy, social realist play and crime thriller. If only the rest of the film matched the slickly confident cinematography.
    Mark Kermode(Observer [UK]): Heli paints a harrowing and ofttimes unbearably grim picture of a lawless marauder country, the indignities of which are made wholly the more powerful by Escalante's apparent compassion for the struggling characters at the caustic end of all this escalating primordial confusion.
    Geoffrey Macnab(Independent): The director Amat Escalante shows affluence of visual flair but his detached, substance-of-fact approach to the distress endured by his protagonists becomes alienating.
    Allan Hunter(Daily Express): Rarely has a lawless come to ~ felt so pitiless and inescapable.
    Steve Rose(Guardian [UK]): It's forceful nonsense, but the way the story drifts and dissipates in the modern stages is disappointing.
    Calum Marsh(Little White Lies): This pitiless torrent of Mexican miserabilism makes as far as concerns alienatingly grim and violent viewing.
    Danny Leigh(Financial Times): Soon, the stylistic flourishes put on't just seem self-conscious excepting cribbed, karaoke shades of Nuri Bilge Ceylan and Harmony Korine.
    Siobhan Synnot(Scotsman): Amat Escalante's uncivil account of a Mexican family who allure the wrath of a drugs cartel. Very contemptible of the gruesome violence is left to your fancy.
    Andrew Lowry(Total Film): There's abundant to admire in Escalante's verve and daring.